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The Application of 3-Dimensional Finite Element Methods to Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Life Prediction

€70.00

€10 p&p UK / €20 p&p Worldwide

Author: A. C. Pickard.
ISBN 0 947817 22 0 (1986), 180 pages.

1. AN INTRODUCTION TO FRACTURE MECHANICS AND LIFE PREDICTION PHILOSOPHY

1.1 Failure Mechanisms

1.2 Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

1.3 Fracture Mechanics Design and Lifing Philosophies

1.3.1 Proof Testing

1.3.2 Non-Destructive Evaluation

1.3.3 Process Capability

1.4 References

2. LINEAR ELASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS – THEORY

2.1Introduction

2.2Definition of Stress; Equilibrium Conditions

2.3Definition of Strain; Compatibility Conditions

2.4Stress – Strain Relationships; Linear Elasticity

2.5Airy’s Stress Functions; The Biharmonic Equation

2.6Solution of the Biharmonic Equation for Crack Configurations

2.6.1 The Williams Polynomial Method

2.6.2 The Westergaard Method

2.7Stored Energy and Energy Release Rates

2.8Griffith Crack Theory

2.9Summary

2.10 References

3. LINER ELASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS – FINITE ELEMENT METHODS

3.1Introduction

3.2Linear Elastic Finite Element Stress Analysis

3.2.1 Displacement Functions

3.2.2 Strains

3.2.3 Stresses

3.2.4 Strain Energy

3.3Special Crack Tip Elements

3.4Derivation of Stress Intensity Factors

3.4.1 Stress Intensity Estimates Based on the
Near-Tip Solution

3.4.2 Stress Intensity Estimates Based on Energy
Methods

3.5Summary

3.6 References

4 STRESS INTENSITY SOLUTIONS FOR PLANAR CRACKS IN THREE- DIMENSIONAL
BODIES

4.1Introduction

4.2Stress Intensity Solutions for Part-Circular Cracks in Simple
Stress Fields

4.2.1 Corner Cracks

4.2.2 Surface Cracks

4.2.3 Subsurface Cracks

4.3Elliptical Crack Fronts – The Aspect Ratio Correction Factor

4.4Complex Stress Fields- The Stress Function

4.4.1 Subsurface Crack Stress Functions

4.4.2 Surface Crack Stress Functions

4.4.3 Radially Varying Stress Fields

4.5Summary

4.6References

5 STRESS INTENSITY SOLUTIONS FOR SOME TYPICAL LABORATORY SPECIMENS

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Specimens Containing Through Cracks

5.2.1 The Compact Tension Specimen

5.2.2 The Keyhole Specimen

5.2.3The Single Edge Cracked Tensile Specimen

5.2.4The Double Edge Cracked Tensile Specimen

5.2.5The Center Cracked Tensile Specimen

5.2.6Notched Tensile Specimens

5.2.7The Single Edge Cracked Bending Specimen

5.3 Specimens Containing Non-Through Part-Elliptic Cracks

5.3.1 The Corner Cracked Specimen – Cracking Normal
to the Tensile vAxis

5.3.2 The Corner Cracked Specimen – Cracking Angled
to the Tensile Axis

5.3.3The Surface Cracked Specimen – Cracking Normal
to the Tensile Axis

5.4 Summary

5.5 References

6. THE APPLICATION OF LINEAR ELASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS METHODS
TO CRACK GROWTH AND LIFE PREDICTION

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Correlation of Crack Growth Behaviour

6.2.1 Fast Fracture Processes

6.2.2 Cycle-Dependent Crack Growth Processes

6.2.3 Time-Dependent Crack Growth Processes

6.3 Life Prediction Methods

6.4 Validation of Life Predictions

6.4.1 Bore Cracking in a Nickel-Chromium-Iron
Superalloy Disc

6.4.2 Diaphragm Cracking in a Waspaloy Turbine
Disc

6.4.3 Hub Face Cracking in a Waspaloy Turbine
Disc

6.4.4 Bore Cracking from a Forging Fold in a Waspaloy
Turbine Disc

6.4.5 Bore Cracking from an Inclusion in a Waspaloy
Turbine Disc

6.4.6 Bore Cracking from Artificial Origins in
a Ti-6Al-4V Disc

6.5 Summary

6.6 References

7. CONCLUSIONS